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Archival description
Bampton Agriculture and Farming With digital objects
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Threshing machine

  • BCA - 2020.2362
  • Item
  • early twentieth century

This threshing machine was used to thresh the grain from the stooks of corn and was the normal way to do this in the first half of the twentieth century, before the combine harvester did the job as the corn was cut in the field.

It was a labour intensive job with people taking stooks from the pile, others lobbed them on to the top where yet more people fed them into the machine. Two ladies and a man can be seen on top of the threshing machine doing this part of the job.

At least one person hooked sacks on to the back to catch the grain while others gathered up the straw and chaff. The straw would have been used for bedding animals under cover in winter and some used as feed.

The whole machine was belt driven - no protection - with power from a steam engine which had men keeping it going in good order. With a live fire in the steam engine, it's no wonder there were fires in the ricks from time to time.

There are 13 people working in this picture. Some have bailing string tied round their calves, probably to stop rats running up as the rick was slowly dismantled.

A threshing machine is nearly always seen working at the Fairford, Faringdon, Filkins & Burford ploughing match held the last Saturday in September on a farm within 16 miles of Lechlade.

Bampton Community Archive

Pre Inclosure map of Clanfield, Bampton, Aston & Yelford

  • BCA - 2020.2392
  • Item
  • 1624

The map is pre Inclosure and covers Clanfield, Bampton, Aston and Yelford. The note with the Yelford map says it was from a map of 1624/5. A note at the right side of the page suggests all these details were pulled together from various sources in 1833 which is post Inclosure, which for the Bampton area was 1821. I can't work out what maps were used for the non-Yelford map but it says HHH is Aston 1771.

Bampton Community Archive

Map of Bampton Estate at 1789

  • BCA - 2019.1890
  • Item
  • 1789

This map shows the Bampton Estates at 1789. This is before the fields were enclosed and the names of the people who farmed the strips or the name of the field area are on the map. The Quies fields are each side of the Bampton to Brize Norton road, just north of what is now Hobbs Buildings.
The Clanfield to Bampton road is showing top to bottom on the map whereas it really runs east west, so you need to get your head around that, literally.
What we now call Welcome Way is called Wiltham Way - it runs south from Cowleaze Corner into Weald.
Weald Common Meadow was south of what we now think of as the area containing the two Bampton Business Parks.
The Bampton to Buckland road is showing going left to right on the map when it actually runs NW to SE; it had a turnpike.

Bampton Community Archive

Four OS maps of Bampton 1971

  • BCA - 2020.2401
  • Item
  • 1971

These four maps were all produce in 1971 and cover

Ordinance Survey Plan SP3002-3102 Weald, Hayway Lane, Weald St, Clanfield Road
Ordinance Survey Plan SP3003-3103. Bridge St east to end of houses, north to new school, Colvile Close
Ordinance Survey Plan SP3203-3303. 1971 Mt Owen Rd east inc. Gogg Lane, Aston Rod to Aston
Ordinance Survey Plan SP3002-3102 1971. Cowleaze Corner, Weald to Aston, north to Horse Shoe PH

Fields, property and farms are all clearly marked.

Bampton Community Archive

Bampton maps of 1921

  • BCA - 2020.2397
  • Item
  • 1921

The map was produced in 1921. The first map is has been reused to show where council houses were to be built on the south side of New Road and where the sewerage pipes were to be laid to the sewerage works along the Buckland Road.

Mains sewerage came to Bampton in 1958 after a long struggle and at a cost of £105,000. Miss Marjorie Pollard was the driving force but in the end, it was the death of Horace Morse who emptied the 'night soil' buckets twice a week which made it imperative. Jack Bellinger was the first manager of the sewerage works.

Bampton Community Archive

2nd edition maps of 1899 Bampton, Black Bourton, Mt Owen Road

  • BCA - 2020.2393
  • Item
  • 1899

These three maps are all labelled as 2nd edition 1899. They cover the area Central Bampton, north & south, east nearly to Aston, Black Bourton south to Cowleaze Corner, east to Elephant & Castle in Bridge Street and Mt Owen Rd, west to road going up to Lew now called Station Road.
They not only show the buildings but someone has written on in pencil when certain plots were sold and to whom.
Interesting to see the clear fish-farming area with the Deanery then called Deanery Farm, Cobb House simply called Vicarage, Churchgate House called Trinity Vicarage. The third vicarage is today called Kilmore House and is almost opposite the East window of St. Mary's.
What today is called Bridge Street was then called Mill Street and the mill was just to the left of path to Sandford Field from Bridge St. The legend is the mill wheel was buried in the plot to the left of the brook walking to the field from Bridge St and the tree there today was planted at its centre.

Bampton Community Archive

1922 map of Clanfield, Alvescot, Black Bourton, Grafton, Bampton, Aston, Cote & Chimney

  • BCA - 2020.2399
  • Item
  • 1922

This map was produced in 1922 and shows the field system as well as the parliamentary boundaries as at 1918.

There are many interesting notes written on in pencil. The water tower and gas works along the Aston Road were in existence. The allotment gardens NW of Beam Cottage are labelled as is the gravel pit to the SW of Beam Cottage.

There are no houses to the north of New Road and none to the south of it going east from Bushey Row.

Rushy Weir is shown clearly as is the tow path to the south side of the river Thames.

Bampton Community Archive